North Korean Hacking Group Lazarus Behind $571M in Hacks Since January 2017

North Korean Hacking Group Lazarus Behind $571M in Hacks Since January 2017

North Korean cybercrime hacking group The Lazarus Group is currently the biggest crypto hacking syndicate in the world, having stolen millions worth of cryptocurrencies from online exchanges. Also known as HIDDEN COBRA, which works at the behest of the North Korean government, the Lazarus Group has been responsible for some of the world's largest cyber attacks including the Sony hack in 2014, the Wannacry ransomware outbreak, military espionage and a number of attacks on South Korean businesses.
Cryptocurrency Exchange’s $170 Million Nano Coin Loss Sparks Outrage

Cryptocurrency Exchange’s $170 Million Nano Coin Loss Sparks Outrage

On Friday, February 9, 2018, Italian cryptocurrency exchange BitGrail announced that “internal checks revealed unauthorized transactions which led to a 17 million Nano [XRB] shortfall, an amount forming part of the wallet managed by BitGrail.

Following Massive Cryptocurrency Hack, Coincheck Pledges to Improve Operations, Refund Losses

Following one of the largest hacks in the history of cryptocurrency, Japanese cryptocurrency exchange Coincheck has announced that it will comply with an order from Japan’s Financial Services Agency to improve its business operations.

BlackWallet Hacked: Warns Stellar Community Not to Log In to Site

On January 13, an unknown hacker(s) hijacked the DNS server for BlackWallet.co, a web-based wallet for the Stellar Lumens cryptocurrency, and redirected it to their own server. Security researcher Kevin Beaumont, who analyzed the code, said, “The DNS hijack of Blackwallet injected code, if you had over 20 Lumens it pushes them to a different wallet.

After Second Hack This Year, South Korean Exchange Youbit Closes Down

South Korean exchange Youbit announced on its website today that it is closing down after a hack early Tuesday, December 19, 2017, that resulted in the loss of 17 percent of its assets. The exchange, previously known as Yapizon, did not indicate how many bitcoins or other cryptocurrencies were stolen or what the total fiat value of the attack amounted to, but it was enough to lead to bankruptcy.

Hacker Allegedly Siphons $31 Million Out of Tether, Driving Further Speculations About the Cryptocurrency

Tether, a cryptocurrency pegged 1-to-1 to the U.S. dollar, was allegedly hacked this week to the tune of $31 million. Tether functions to convert U.S. dollars to a type of cryptocurrency. The project’s token (USDT) is pegged to the dollar and is used in exchange trading. The idea behind Tether is that instead of having to sell your bitcoin or other token for a fiat currency, you can convert it to USDT, and either hold it in USDT or else transfer your USDT to another exchange and use it to purchase tokens there.

De-briefing Ethereum’s Parity Predicament: What’s Next?

After an unidentified actor “accidentally” triggered a series of bugs that destroyed approximately $150 million worth of digital currency, the world waits for a substantive answer — is this vulnerability an anomaly? An “I told you so”? Or a humbling opportunity to secure the Ethereum network? What Happened? On November 6, “Devops199,” an alleged amateur programmer, set off a chain of bugs on Parity, a popular digital wallet for Ethereum.

De-briefing Ethereum’s Parity Predicament: What’s Next?

After an unidentified actor “accidentally” triggered a series of bugs that destroyed approximately $150 million worth of digital currency, the world waits for a substantive answer — is this vulnerability an anomaly? An “I told you so”? Or a humbling opportunity to secure the Ethereum network? What Happened? On November 6, “Devops199,” an alleged amateur programmer, set off a chain of bugs on Parity, a popular digital wallet for Ethereum.
Is Your Ether Frozen? Parity Launches Support Website In Wake of Exploit

Is Your Ether Frozen? Parity Launches Support Website In Wake of Exploit

U.K.-based startup Parity Technologies is opening lines of communication with users a day after a code vulnerability locked hundreds out of their ethereum wallets. Issued in an alert Wednesday, the provider of software for the world's second-largest blockchain explained what went wrong and launched a website where users can check their addresses to see if their funds were affected. Parity also posted an email address for users to contact the company.
Ethereum Security Lead: Hard Fork Required to Release Frozen Parity Funds

Ethereum Security Lead: Hard Fork Required to Release Frozen Parity Funds

A resolution has yet to be found for yesterday's Parity hack which saw up to $150 million frozen across the ethereum platform. However, speaking to CoinDesk, Martin Holst Swende, head of security for the Ethereum Foundation, confirmed that a hard fork of the ethereum blockchain will be required to free up the funds. Holst Swende said: "There's unfortunately no way to recreate the code without a hard fork.